Interviews

Valore: “I love the look on people’s faces when I tell them I’m a rapper”

On your Facebook page, you describe yourself as “a bright green cactus that brings color to a canvas of barren sand”. What does that mean? : ) It’s from a poem of mine, the rest of it is “come to me and find comfort, let’s feel the music and look at the stars. Let’s give … Continue reading “Valore: “I love the look on people’s faces when I tell them I’m a rapper””

Justina: “In Iran people think girls shouldn’t sing”

How and when did you discover hip hop? I have been in love with music since I was a child and used to sing a lot, but never thought I’d be a singer one day. I was familiar with American rap but discovered Persian rap when I was 16 with the Iranian underground hip hop … Continue reading “Justina: “In Iran people think girls shouldn’t sing””

Rell Rock: “As a woman you can do whatever you set your mind to without being viewed as a sex object”

How old were you when you discovered hip hop for the first time and what made you want to become a rapper? I actually grew up listening to it so basically all my life but the age where I were able to understand the true meaning I had to be around 12 maybe 13 but … Continue reading “Rell Rock: “As a woman you can do whatever you set your mind to without being viewed as a sex object””

Sianna: “No one is born a racist but they become one by not thinking by themselves”

Your first EP “Sianna” was released in March 2015. How did it go when you first met Warner Chappell and signed with them? I first met my two managers Mohand and Seven, who introduced me to Sandrice Runser, my publisher. We immediately got along and shared the same vision. She was Diam’s’ publisher and was looking … Continue reading “Sianna: “No one is born a racist but they become one by not thinking by themselves””

Niña Dioz: “Times are still hard for women in Mexico”

When and how did you decide to become a rapper? I had a childhood friend who also loved hip hop, we would listen to The Fugees and  TLC together when we were like 8 or 9 years old… I’ve dreaming to become a rapper ever since when I knew there were other females doing it. But when I … Continue reading “Niña Dioz: “Times are still hard for women in Mexico””

Fred Musa: “There is a problem of female representativeness in the whole society in general”

You’ve been hosting “Planete Rap” for nearly twenty years. How many female rappers did you have on your show? As a matter of fact, very little. Of course there was Diam’s, who brought about a revolution. I’d say she’s the best of all rappers, regardless of gender. More recently, there were people like Sianna or Ladea, but it’s true … Continue reading “Fred Musa: “There is a problem of female representativeness in the whole society in general””

ChaCha: “Hip hop is big in China but there are little female artists involved”

How did you become an artist? Did you receive any musical training when you were younger? I studied piano when I was young, not for a long time, but it helped me learn some basic knowledge of music. I had a rock band when I was in high school as a singer and a keyboard player. That’s … Continue reading “ChaCha: “Hip hop is big in China but there are little female artists involved””

FemiOne: “Why do people feel the need to call us ‘female rappers’?”

What made you want to become a rapper? When I was in primary school, I used to listen to Wenyeji and Necessary Noize , cram their verses and rap during breaks in school. My interest in rap started there and I realized I had it in me and I needed to pursue it. You say in your bio “I’m … Continue reading “FemiOne: “Why do people feel the need to call us ‘female rappers’?””

Gavlyn: “I’m taking my time and focusing on spreading the word”

What made you want to become a rapper?  What made me wanna become a rapper was definitely my love for music first of course and also the way I grew up. I stayed at home a lot watching my little brother so I listened to rap a lot and had a lot of time to … Continue reading “Gavlyn: “I’m taking my time and focusing on spreading the word””

Klutch Kollective: “The key to life’s opportunities is equality”

26-year-old singer/dancer/pianist/producer from Johannesburg Toya Delazy launches Klutch Kollective, the first all-female rap crew in South Africa. Whereas the artist has just been selected for the second and final round of the Midem Artist Accelerator taking place in Cannes at the beginning of June 2016, Klutch Kollective gave their first international interview to Madame Rap! … Continue reading “Klutch Kollective: “The key to life’s opportunities is equality””

Strange Froots: “Women need to know that they can do hip hop their own way”

Meet the Quebec rap band Strange Froots and the three Black and queer female rappers and singers: Mags (Senegalese-Ghanaian born in the US), Naïka Champaïgne (Quebec-Haitian) and SageS (Jamaican-Canadian). As the trio just released the video “The Wanderer”, they told us about the female rap scene in Montreal, how their identities impacts their music and … Continue reading “Strange Froots: “Women need to know that they can do hip hop their own way””

Lucy Camp: “My music is versatile”

San Jose rapper Lucy Camp told us about her first encounter with rap and her new hip hop new wave EP “Summer Camp”, released on the independent label Quintic Records.  When and how did you discover hip hop? Growing up my uncle would play a lot of rap music. I remember the first rap song … Continue reading “Lucy Camp: “My music is versatile””

D’ de Kabal: “Many male rappers think they’re revolutionaries but never talk about sexism or homophobia”

When and how did you start to rap? I started to rap at the age of 19 after an Assassin concert. It was in 1993, during their “Le futur que nous réserve-t-il ?” tour. I went to see them with my homie Djamal and we were blown away. It was Rockin’ Squat, Solo, Doctor L  on drums and Dee Nasty on … Continue reading “D’ de Kabal: “Many male rappers think they’re revolutionaries but never talk about sexism or homophobia””

Sharaya J: “Stand for something or fall for anything”

After two years of silence, Sharaya J is back with the mixtape “Dope Product – Vol. 1” and the video “BIG”. The MC from Jersey City told Madame Rap about her decisive encounter with Missy Elliott – she signed to The Goldmind  Inc. in 2010 before launching her own production company Banji Entertainment LLC in 2016 –, her BANJI movement … Continue reading “Sharaya J: “Stand for something or fall for anything””

Reykjavíkurdætur: “We need to stick together to break the status quo on the rap scene”

Your bio says Reykjavíkurdætur is made up of 16 femcees. Some articles say you are 17, other 19. How many are you for real?   16 plus a DJ who plays with us on gigs! The collective was created in 2013 and none of you was rapping before getting together. How did you learn to … Continue reading “Reykjavíkurdætur: “We need to stick together to break the status quo on the rap scene””

Pumpkin: “Being an indie female rapper outside the mold is political in itself”

You say you discovered hip hop with French rapper MC Solaar, without understanding it was rap. Which other artists made you want to become a rapper? IAM, NTM, Oxmo Puccino, Triptik, Raggasonic, Les Sages Poètes de la rue, Diam’s, Mélaaz, Alliance Ethnik, Ménélik, Fabe, Sens Unik, Nas, The Fugees, Warren G, the artists of the … Continue reading “Pumpkin: “Being an indie female rapper outside the mold is political in itself””

Red Shaydez: “It’s no secret that hip hop is a male-dominated industry”

You started making music at the age of 7.How did that happen? Were you already into hip hop at the time?  Growing up I was exposed to Hip Hop at an early age. My father was in a rap group at the time and I was there for all of the groundwork that they put … Continue reading “Red Shaydez: “It’s no secret that hip hop is a male-dominated industry””

Dee MC: “There is a larger side of India where women are still treated unequally”

You started performing when you were five. What was your first encounter with hip hop music? I started training for Bharatanatyam (form of Indian classical dance) when I was 5. I started listening to hip hop music when I was in school, around the 8th grade. You said that if you didn’t become a rapper … Continue reading “Dee MC: “There is a larger side of India where women are still treated unequally””

Qbala: “I see the importance in standing for women’s rights on the front lines”

You were born in Loveland and now live in Fort Collins. How is the hip hop scene like in Northern Colorado? Fort Collins is blowing up right now. There is a lot of room for growth but there is also a lot of individual growth between crews. The mentality of worrying about who is doing … Continue reading “Qbala: “I see the importance in standing for women’s rights on the front lines””

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