Interviews

Klutch Kollective: “The key to life’s opportunities is equality”

26-year-old singer/dancer/pianist/producer from Johannesburg Toya Delazy launches Klutch Kollective, the first all-female rap crew in South Africa. Whereas the artist has just been selected for the second and final round of the Midem Artist Accelerator taking place in Cannes at the beginning of June 2016, Klutch Kollective gave their first international interview to Madame Rap! … Continue reading “Klutch Kollective: “The key to life’s opportunities is equality””

Strange Froots: “Women need to know that they can do hip hop their own way”

Meet the Quebec rap band Strange Froots and the three Black and queer female rappers and singers: Mags (Senegalese-Ghanaian born in the US), Naïka Champaïgne (Quebec-Haitian) and SageS (Jamaican-Canadian). As the trio just released the video “The Wanderer”, they told us about the female rap scene in Montreal, how their identities impacts their music and … Continue reading “Strange Froots: “Women need to know that they can do hip hop their own way””

Lucy Camp: “My music is versatile”

San Jose rapper Lucy Camp told us about her first encounter with rap and her new hip hop new wave EP “Summer Camp”, released on the independent label Quintic Records.  When and how did you discover hip hop? Growing up my uncle would play a lot of rap music. I remember the first rap song … Continue reading “Lucy Camp: “My music is versatile””

D’ de Kabal: “Many male rappers think they’re revolutionaries but never talk about sexism or homophobia”

When and how did you start to rap? I started to rap at the age of 19 after an Assassin concert. It was in 1993, during their “Le futur que nous réserve-t-il ?” tour. I went to see them with my homie Djamal and we were blown away. It was Rockin’ Squat, Solo, Doctor L  on drums and Dee Nasty on … Continue reading “D’ de Kabal: “Many male rappers think they’re revolutionaries but never talk about sexism or homophobia””

Sharaya J: “Stand for something or fall for anything”

After two years of silence, Sharaya J is back with the mixtape “Dope Product – Vol. 1” and the video “BIG”. The MC from Jersey City told Madame Rap about her decisive encounter with Missy Elliott – she signed to The Goldmind  Inc. in 2010 before launching her own production company Banji Entertainment LLC in 2016 –, her BANJI movement … Continue reading “Sharaya J: “Stand for something or fall for anything””

Reykjavíkurdætur: “We need to stick together to break the status quo on the rap scene”

Your bio says Reykjavíkurdætur is made up of 16 femcees. Some articles say you are 17, other 19. How many are you for real?   16 plus a DJ who plays with us on gigs! The collective was created in 2013 and none of you was rapping before getting together. How did you learn to … Continue reading “Reykjavíkurdætur: “We need to stick together to break the status quo on the rap scene””

Pumpkin: “Being an indie female rapper outside the mold is political in itself”

You say you discovered hip hop with French rapper MC Solaar, without understanding it was rap. Which other artists made you want to become a rapper? IAM, NTM, Oxmo Puccino, Triptik, Raggasonic, Les Sages Poètes de la rue, Diam’s, Mélaaz, Alliance Ethnik, Ménélik, Fabe, Sens Unik, Nas, The Fugees, Warren G, the artists of the … Continue reading “Pumpkin: “Being an indie female rapper outside the mold is political in itself””

Red Shaydez: “It’s no secret that hip hop is a male-dominated industry”

You started making music at the age of 7.How did that happen? Were you already into hip hop at the time?  Growing up I was exposed to Hip Hop at an early age. My father was in a rap group at the time and I was there for all of the groundwork that they put … Continue reading “Red Shaydez: “It’s no secret that hip hop is a male-dominated industry””

Dee MC: “There is a larger side of India where women are still treated unequally”

You started performing when you were five. What was your first encounter with hip hop music? I started training for Bharatanatyam (form of Indian classical dance) when I was 5. I started listening to hip hop music when I was in school, around the 8th grade. You said that if you didn’t become a rapper … Continue reading “Dee MC: “There is a larger side of India where women are still treated unequally””

Qbala: “I see the importance in standing for women’s rights on the front lines”

You were born in Loveland and now live in Fort Collins. How is the hip hop scene like in Northern Colorado? Fort Collins is blowing up right now. There is a lot of room for growth but there is also a lot of individual growth between crews. The mentality of worrying about who is doing … Continue reading “Qbala: “I see the importance in standing for women’s rights on the front lines””

KT Gorique: “It was really hard for me to identify with femcees because there were so little of them”

How and when did you begin to be interested in hip hop? When I lived in Ivory Coast as a child, I listened mostly to African music, gospel or the King of Pop. I was firstly interested in dancing. Michael Jackson had this way of moving that I had never seen before. He was like … Continue reading “KT Gorique: “It was really hard for me to identify with femcees because there were so little of them””

Rebeca Lane: “Women have always been oppressed over human history”

Your biography is quite crazy! Can you just sum up for us the political context in which you were born and how that led you to hip hop? That’s a very difficult question for a sociologist haha. But I’ll try. There was in Guatemala between 1954 and 1996. I was born in 1984, during the … Continue reading “Rebeca Lane: “Women have always been oppressed over human history””

Poetic Pilgrimage: “France has a problem with Muslim women”

Madame Rap interviewed UK female rap duo Poetic Pilgrimage on hip hop, feminism and religion. Find Poetic Pilgrimage on their website, Facebook and Twitter.

Kate Tempest: “I found the resilience that you have to have”

The award-winning British poet/rapper/poet/playwright/novelist Kate Tempest releases the album Let Them Eat Chaos. Madame Rap met her in Paris to discuss feminism, hip hop and writing. How and when did you discover hip hop music? I think I was about 12 or 13 when I fell in love with it. I always listened to music, but the … Continue reading “Kate Tempest: “I found the resilience that you have to have””

Reverie: “I have no time or energy to devote to hating people”

Los Angeles rapper Reverie told us about her influences, sexism in hip hop and her upcoming European tour. How and when did you discover hip hop? I really don’t really remember the very first time I “discovered hip-hop” but I do remember being as young as 5 years old, in the kindergarten, singing rap songs … Continue reading “Reverie: “I have no time or energy to devote to hating people””

Paradise Sorouri: “Women’s roles have evolved in the Afghan society thanks to hip hop”

Paradise Sourouri is the first female rapper in Afghanistan. She told Madame Rap about how she founded the hip hop duo 143Band with Diverse and her fight for gender equality and freedom of speech.  How and when did you discover hip hop and how did you and Diverse found 143Band ?  Diverse and I both discovered hip … Continue reading “Paradise Sorouri: “Women’s roles have evolved in the Afghan society thanks to hip hop””

Phlow: “Your gender should not have to determine what you wish to achieve”

You started rapping when you were a teenager. How did that happen? Well when I was a younger, my older brother was part of a gospel rap group and I thought it was so cool. I also thought “I could totally write raps too“. While they would be working on their songs, I would go … Continue reading “Phlow: “Your gender should not have to determine what you wish to achieve””

BauBô: “In France, rap is like football, it’s a guy thing”

Where does the name BauBô come from? BauBô is the goddess of bawdy humor and the belly in Greek mythology. I discovered her when I read Clarissa Pinkolas Estes’ book Women Who run With the Wolves. She is a small goddess with eyes at the end of her breasts and has got a vulva instead of … Continue reading “BauBô: “In France, rap is like football, it’s a guy thing””

Blimes Brixton: “Queer people got sick of the music they love not ever being written from their perspective”

Should we call you Blimes Brixton or Oh Blimey? Sorry we’re confused! Blimes Brixton. Oh Blimey was the younger version of me. I feel like I’ve grown a lot in the last few years both as a human and as a writer and I wanted my career to reflect that. How and when did you … Continue reading “Blimes Brixton: “Queer people got sick of the music they love not ever being written from their perspective””

Next

Previous